Is tooth health affected by occupation?

Is tooth health affected by occupation?

Whether from a fall, a misuse of equipment or workplace violence, dental injuries can pose a threat in a wide range of industries. Work-related dental injuries include chipped or cracked teeth, tooth loss and jaw trauma leading to temporomandibular disorders (TMJ).

What do you call a person who takes care of your teeth?

Orthodontist. An orthodontist is the oral health care provider who specializes in diagnosis, prevention, interception, and treatment of malocclusions, or “bad bites,” of the teeth and surrounding structures.

What does good dental health mean?

The goal is to prevent complications such as tooth decay (cavities) and gum disease and to maintain the overall health of your mouth. A healthy mouth, free of infections, injuries and other problems with teeth and gums, is important in maintaining your overall health.

How important is dental health to you personally?

Why is it important to practice good dental hygiene? Good oral/dental health translates to good health overall. Dental problems such as cavities or gum disease can impair your ability to eat and speak properly, cause pain and bad breath.

How do you get veneers?

The dentist makes an impression, or mold, of the prepared teeth. The dentist also decides on the veneer shade that will be best for your smile. The impression is sent to a dental lab that custom-makes the porcelain veneers to fit your teeth. This may take several days.

Why is it important to keep your teeth clean?

Daily brushing and cleaning between your teeth is important because it removes plaque. If the plaque isn’t removed, it continues to build up, feeding on the bits of food left behind and causing tooth decay and gum disease.

Can you get veneers with bad teeth?

You cannot use veneers for tooth decay cover-up. Dr. Wolfe must remove the tooth decay first before considering giving you dental veneers.

What does poor oral hygiene cause?

Most people know that not brushing your teeth daily can lead to cavities, bad breath and tooth decay. But recent studies find that poor dental hygiene can also have unexpected health consequences, such as increased risks for Alzheimer’s disease and heart disease.