What is an expungement process?

What is an expungement process?

California criminal expungement is a process that petitions the Court to review a conviction and allows a defendant to withdraw their plea or finding of guilt; a new “Not Guilty” plea is entered by the Court, and the case is ordered dismissed, and the conviction set aside.

How much does expungement cost in Illinois?

An expungement application costs at least $120 just for the paperwork to be submitted in the simplest cases. Lawyer counseling fees to help you get the paperwork done properly vary depending on the complexity of your case, but expect us to charge you $500 minimum just to get into the case, and more if it is complex.

Can you expunge more than one charge?

If you were charged with more than one offense based on the same incident, transaction, or set of facts, you can only have records from that case expunged if ALL the charges from that incident are eligible for expungement. For example, a person might be charged with three separate offenses based on the same incident.

What does Expunction mean?

To “expunge” is to “erase or remove completely.” In law, “expungement” is the process by which a record of criminal conviction is destroyed or sealed from state or federal record. Likewise, pardons are not expungements and do not require removal of a conviction from a criminal record.

How many times can your record be expunged?

Generally, you may only receive an expungement once. (N.J.S.A 2C:52-14). Therefore, you should try to expunge all eligible records at one time. After receiving your first expungement, if you are convicted for another crime, you will not be able to expunge that conviction.

How can I get my record expunged in Illinois for free?

You may call toll-free (866) 787-1776 in Chicago or (866) 431-4907 Statewide, or e-mail [email protected]

Do I qualify for expungement in Illinois?

If you were convicted of a crime in Illinois, your record typically cannot be expunged, but it may be eligible for sealing. Most misdemeanor and felony convictions qualify for sealing in Illinois, but some—including driving under the influence, domestic battery, animal care crimes, and most sex offenses—do not.